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More Visions of Retire Meant

Flower Spiral © lynette sheppard

We received so many great responses from you all – thank you so much for sharing your thoughts. I wanted to make sure that these visions didn’t get lost in the comments, so am posting them in this blog entry. Be sure to read to the end, where R shares some concerns about retirement. We all learn from sharing our wisdom with one another, so thank you again!

PK wrote:  

I’m 64 now. I’ve been working since I was 10, at one gig or another. Can’t say I was dedicated to most of those gigs – they were a way to make a living, to support my other interests. Some of them were more intrinsically interesting than others, and one aligned with my higher purpose and felt really satisfactory. For the last 6 years I’ve worked from home primarily as a virtual office manager for a company based on the mainland. I’ve investigated the Social Security retirement plans and am staging a 2-year withdrawal from this company. However, my husband may get a full-time college professor job this year – and then I would retire almost immediately. What would I do with myself? I can think of about 1000 things – but first volunteer with children, be the full-time artist I’ve wanted to be all my life, garden, bake, be a domestic goddess, raise chickens. I look forward to it.

JM shares her own vision: 

Aloha Ladies, I am 61 and still have a 17 year old son at home. He is a jr in high school. Im still so very active being a mom and a grandmother to 11. I teach hula 3 times a week plus work. Being a photographer I can pick and choose my work times. I get a little sad thinking that one day coming up my son will be moving on. I see his excitement and dont want to dampen his enthusiasm for moving out of moms house! So this has been good for me to read as most of you have already passed this point years ago. I am not sure exactly what I will do, but Im sure traveling will be in the picture! Hula keeps me thriving so Im thinking of moving into taking classes to become a Kumu Hula. The older I get the more important relationships are, all relationships including my ancestors. I personally feel there is a whole new world waiting for me.
Yes I have sleepless nights, yes I still get too hot and then too cold. I just giggle and dont let myself get caught in any drama over it. I feel very alive and healthy.

K is looking forward to retirement too:  

As I approach retirement from about 3-1/2 years out — I think about it more and more often.

Right now, I feel like I am in kind of a transition or rehearsal phase. When I take a planned day off from work, I try to mimic what I would do if I didn’t have to report to the grindstone ever again. What would I do if I had my time as my own?

Most times, I try to spend some time in nature, taking a short hike on a trail I haven’t walked before and really open my eyes and drink in the textures, smells, and sights I will have the time to savor in the future.

I think a lot about the type of retired grandma I want to be. I want to be an active and a fun one to be around. One of my daughters is not too domesticated, so I’d like to expose her daughter to some of my favorite pasttimes (embroidery, sewing, gardening) that she otherwise doesn’t get to experience. (I’ve already begun that, but want to continue if it’s something she wants. I learned so much of this kind of thing from my grandmother).

Since the out-of-doors is important and nurturing for me, I would like to share that with my grandkids and continue to with my husband as long as possible. I see camping and many local hikes in the future. There’s a wonderful group of older women who maintain trails and camp together; I’ve been dreaming of joining them.

I branch out my thoughts to the dark times, winter and days when the driving rain keeps me indoors. I like to think I will busy myself finishing long-abandoned projects, starting new ones, taking classes on old and new hobbies. There are many groups who meet in our library system for conversations on local issues, arts, hobbies, travel, foreign language practice, and of course, books! I look forward to accessing those.

So, I guess what retirement means to me is that it is a trigger for the next exciting life series! I’ve done the rest—here comes the best! It’s a time of becoming enriched and enriching the lives of those you love. Of not letting life simply pass by, but enjoying and savoring every moment.

Still, not every woman is looking forward to retirement. R, a menopause Goddess sister from Portugal shares her concerns. I suspect she is not the only one of us caught in some conflict about these changes. Here’s her heartfelt musings:

I’ve found Menopause Goddesses blog by chance, sometimes I read it with the most attention, and sometimes not I have to say.
Retirement subject is not very close for me yet, I’m a Portuguese 55 years woman living near Lisbon our capital and this year the allowed retirement age as come to 66 years and 3 months, or 60 years age and 40 of discount career for pension found, this last option with 6%/year tax and a sustainability tax of 13,8%, resuming, too much limitative for us to think about it, unless you think to live your retirement begging. Situation in Portugal is not friendly for those that think retire sooner than official age.

Although the approaching of that stage of live for my husband, that is 5 years older than me, scares me a lot, besides work he always count with me next to him for everything and I’m afraid to feel myself under a dominance I’m not used to.
I know that in US young people leave their parents’ home when they went to university but in Portugal we have not that tradition, only the students that have less score classifications go to universities outside their residence area.

My 2 daughters with 33 (the older is a journalist and actually is working as public relations) and 26 years (she’s a nurse) have study near and they’re still living with us.
The difficulty to rent or buy a flat in our country is huge for young, and the salaries sometimes are not enough to face their responsibilities sooner, they are now both thinking to rent a flat and share expenses, this situation is causing me the feeling of empty nest, the past 35 years I’ve been first a mother, a wife and less a woman so I’m feeling lost and I don’t know my role any more, I’m beginning to feel also the weight of menopause literally (both: body weight and feelings).

Sorry if I extended myself too much but we still feel this subject as banned in our society, the women don’t like to show their disability to face this stage of mind and always try to show themselves very open mind, with millions of activities, dressing as teenagers sometimes acting if their daughters were rivals.
Thanks for sharing with us.

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Retire Meant – Menopause Goddesses Share Their Visions

Sunrise or Sunset? © lynette sheppard

Several of you responded; others are still thinking about and crafting their replies. Here are some of the visions shared by our readers. Enjoy! I surely did!

MB shared:  “I am not retired yet. ( I am soon to be 56 years old. ) BUT, I’m in college now, dual enrolled for two professions, pursuing a dream to work on my own terms and from home using all the experience I’ve gained working for the healthcare industry for the last 30 years in customer service.  I am 2 semesters away from my first college degree!  And 3 months away from a new credential!

So retirement to me looks like a home office, my dog next to me, my husband running our video game store at the local mall, and being on call for my second job as a Clinical Medical Assistant to get my “people” fix when I need it!

I am glad I’m at this place in my life- hot flashes, weight gain, no- filter -mouth and all.  It’s trying at times, but it’s my life and I’m making the best of it!”

BT responded with these thoughts:  “I enjoy your blog posts very much and just had to chime in about my thoughts regarding retirement.

Recently I had to really give this thought as I realized I had many emotions around it. I’ll be 54 in July. Recently, my 57 year old neighbor retired from a job she worked at her entire career and off to a warmer climate she and her husband went for a few months. While yes, I’d like a little more time in the sun, perhaps doing less at times, I couldn’t help but think what it must feel like to have devoted your whole life, often working more than forty hours a week, to now not working.

It brought up those transitional periods in our lives when we can feel lost, as I’ve felt a few times in my life. I wonder how it is affecting her as she was very devoted to her work. I’ve also been with women going through transition from a job they were very dedicated to until what is deemed “retirement age” and now not sure who they are anymore – as if they lost their identity and sense of purpose.

As I sat with the many feelings, I realized how it’s important to me to keep making an impact with my tribe that I continue to build. And how making a difference is so important to me and leaving a legacy, not necessarily as what I do, but in hopes that I help people (especially women) feel good about their lives and find meaning in them. I don’t see as that ever ends, but something that is so important to me and my own vitality because it feels good to my soul to make a difference where I can.

So thanks for the question and asking for  feedback. I’ll be curious to read what others have to say!”

CH offered these gems: Retirement (“the action or fact of leaving one’s job and ceasing to work”) . . . well, to me
who had a wake up call in my late 40’s that there was more to life than my narrow
perspective of my job, I think perhaps there is a more enlighten way to view this
transition. Leaving behind the work schedule allows us to connect with life in a whole
new way . . . discovering the opportunity to connect with passion.

I am amazed at the narrowness many view retirement . . . travel. I am reminded of my
soul sister in the NW (Anne Fangman who published her memoir: Mustard Every Monday:
From Secluded Convent to International Travel) responds to those wondering at her
retirement party if she was going to travel? “Been there, done that! I’m going to
stay home and enjoy life.”)

Opportunities abound once we don’t clock in and clock out. Watching friends nearby has
been a wonder to watch as they grapple with the time on their hands and how they
discover ways of connecting with themselves, others and “nature.”

I am looking forward to your posts on retirement!!!

CR shared her experience:  “Time is both your friend and your enemy … you do not have to get everything done today because yes, there will be tomorrow,
you do have time if you choose to have coffee with friends which was not possible very often when you are working..
but you also have funerals on a much more frequent basis …
I find I make it a priority to go to the Y several times a week
both for fitness but because sometimes those are the only people I see all day or all week.
I have started cleaning out my house I have lived here a very long time.. so when something happens My son will not have to do much…
I now have time to learn things i have always been interested in
and not be bothered with stuff I just don’t care about… there are things you do for others because you care about them , but I am much more selective about them.  Time is the most valuable commodity in the world .. and when you retire you realize it is more valuable than you ever realized . I make time to be with people that make me laugh; that has not always been an option .. now it is.
I look at retirement as a gift … and I am lucky to be here.”

BeFabRevolution is retiring on her own terms: “Hi Ladies, I am soon going to leave my nearly 25 year career as a corporate consultant. I have loved it. It has been interesting and often challenging, but I’m just over it. I’ll be 58 later this year and have had an overwhelming need to reinvent myself.

I am “retiring” from a strict schedule, but am too sharp and energetic to not have a new, more interesting challenge.

I have been laying the groundwork for nearly the past 2 years to launch a new business, catering to women age 50+. I launch the business next week. Woohoo!

Lynette, I need you as an expert speaker for 2017!!! I am so excited! I guess my “retirement” comes in being my own boss and being of service in a very different way.”

And a very treasured response comes from my own mother:  “As an 82 year old, find that life is what you make it. For me life is great as i have a great daughter and son-in law. Love is so important !”
Betty    AKa mom

Vibrancy comes to mind when I read these visions. Any other thoughts, insights, ideas? Put them in the comments or send them to me at lynette@9points.com  I look forward to more wisdom, questioning, input. Thank you so much to those who shared so generously! Virtual hugs to you all!

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Vaginal Dryness – Affects One in Three Women

High Sierra Flowers © lynette sheppard

High Sierra Flowers © lynette sheppard

Wow. One in three – that is a lot! (There are a lot of us baby boomers that have come of age.)

Menopause brings many changes and one that really affects our intimacy is vaginal dryness. The folks at Genneve are committed to helping with this with their special lubricants designed to mimic our natural moisture. They sent me some samples (and since, yes, I am one of the one in three), I will be testing it. In the meantime, enjoy this video that brings the topic to light.

You might want to check out the blog on their site too – lots of great info: click here

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How Do We Inform Ourselves About Menopause?

Christmas bouganvill

That is the question that Jamie Cooper is trying to answer in her doctoral research study at University of South Florida. She is asking for participation in her online survey questionnaire.  She’d like women aged 35 -55 to share their experiences with her; your answers will be confidential and anonymous.

Jamie hopes to help improve the lives of women at midlife now and in the future. Now that’s some research we can get behind. Women sharing wisdom – that’s what we are all about. Here’s the link:

http:tinyurl.com/menopausestudy

If you have questions for Jamie, you can email her at jc2@usf.edu.

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Elderhood: Embracing New Values

 

Opening © lynette sheppard

Opening © lynette sheppard

After menopause, aging can jump to the top of the concerns list. Aging comes with a multitude of changes. Some of them are disconcerting in the extreme: droopy skin, aches, jowls, invisibility, hot flashes and the like.  These changes require adjustment and acceptance. They are here to stay.

However, some of the changes are nothing short of marvelous. If I were offered the return of my physical youth in exchange for the wisdom accumulated atop my wrinkles, I’d turn it down. Oh, I’d think about it for a minute or two, to be sure. But it seems to me that the gifts far outweigh the losses; at least so far.

One of the biggest gifts has been a change in the values that are most pivotal in my life. I sat down to make a list of how my values have morphed over the decades.

Value harmony and understanding more than being right
Being right is not all it’s cracked up to be. Being right means someone else is wrong and these days, it just doesn’t seem worth it. I’d rather find common ground or try to understand another viewpoint than be right.

Value silence as much as discourse
Actually, I value it more. When quiet, I can feel others and connect on a more elemental level. I have found that presence and togetherness do not require spoken word. Silence is no longer uncomfortable to me, but a soul satisfying cloak that I can wrap around me.

Value kindness more than mental acumen or braininess
I used to be wowed by those who were smart, quick, clever and strove to be like them. These later years have me admiring and emulating kindness and compassion more than accumulated knowledge. I am deeply drawn to those with emotional intelligence.

Value presence more than accomplishment
Our culture perpetuates doing to the exclusion of being. Small wonder that so many of us feel guilty when we aren’t accomplishing (yes, I fall prey to this all the time, but I’m working on it.) I am in awe when I meet those who make no apology for being, who relax in their non-doing moments.

Value plain more than fancy
I love plain food, comfortable clothes, just hanging out with friends and family rather than big excursions or amusements. The fancy or complicated things feel like they sap my energy rather than filling me up. Less really does feel like more these days.

Value learning more than teaching
This is weird. We elders have a fair amount to impart and may take this responsibility quite seriously. Yet, as I age, I am struck also by how little I really do know and can revel in the pure joy of learning without putting pressure on myself to “do something with it” or succeed. As far as I’m concerned, we get an A just for trying.

Value self deprecating humor over sarcasm
I’d rather laugh at myself or the human condition in all its sweetness than indulge in snarky humor. Besides, when I look at myself, there is just so much comic material that I need never stop chuckling.

Value internal peace over external validation
While I still check Facebook for the number of “likes” that Menopause Goddess Blog receives, it matters to me less and less. When I feel that I have given my best with an open heart, I feel centered and peaceful, less craving feedback from others.

Value communion rather than nomenclature
I really don’t care as much about the names of birds, plants, butterflies as I once did. What really thrills me is just hanging out with flora and fauna, feeling a part of the oneness of existence. OK, it’s a little challenging with cockroaches and centipedes, but they too have a certain quirky beauty.

Value taking time over time management
In the autumn of my life, I find that I just don’t get as much done. I’m not as productive or efficient. Many items on my to-do list are carried over for days, even weeks. This bothers me less and less as I surrender to the bliss of just taking time for myself. Daydreaming, writing, reading, walking are all as important as getting my chores done. Weirdly enough, the chores seem easier when I’ve taken time to just re-create myself.

What changes might yet be in store? I don’t know but I’m looking forward with curiosity, excitement, and some trepidation. So far, I like what I’ve discovered on this life’s journey.

Perhaps you also have values that have changed – share them here in the comments.  We learn so much from one another, so please don’t be shy.

(I originally wrote a version of this post for the Celebrate What’s Right Blog. I’ve found that during this time when so much can be wrong, celebrating what is right can ease the more daunting passages.)

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A Guide to Creating Me Time

Paradise Palms © lynette sheppard

Paradise Palms © lynette sheppard

First off, I want to thank all my sister goddesses who wrote me about which topics were uppermost on their priorities for the “Second Adulthood” posts. I promise that I will get to all of them – eventually. Most are high priority for me as well, as I traverse this second half of life. And please, if you have thoughts, insights, or offerings to help us along the way, share them! That’s how we survive and thrive – together!

 “Me Time” was mentioned so many times that it jumped to the top of the list. I used to think (and say) that I needed to find time for me, as if it were lost or misplaced and I had only to stumble upon it to have it. I know now that I was completely off base.

Me time can’t be found. It must be created. We have to actively set aside time for ourselves or risk never having any. Sure, there are always demands on our time. For years, we put aside ourselves for other people and priorities. The rare massage or infrequent bubble bath just didn’t fill the need, though they helped some.

So, how do we go about creating “me time”?

First and foremost, we have to believe that “me time” is important, even critical. Right now. Because it is.

Second, we have to be clear with our family and friends that this is a necessity and in no way diminishes our relationships with them. In fact, they may come to see that a refreshed, revitalized intimate is more present and connected, a pleasure to be around. It can only enhance our relationships.

Third, we must schedule it and keep it as a sacred covenant, to be broken only in case of a true emergency. (And I have found from this vantage point in life that very few of the “emergencies” I responded to earlier in my First Act were truly as urgent as I made them out to be or that I was the ONLY one who could respond. Discernment is called for in such a case.)

Right now, I am writing this blog post from my hotel room on the island of Kauai. I’m sitting in the middle of a bed with four, count them: four, fluffy white pillows propping me up. Sister goddess Lei and I are attending a multi day hula conference. Hula is something we love and share; it nourishes us. However, it is intense to go from early am to late night learning and sharing dances. And while this trip is a type of “me time”, it can be tiring both mentally and physically.

So we’ve learned to schedule a day prior to the conference and a day after to just “be”. We might hang by the pool, make art, or just take a walk on the beach. We might talk. Or not. Naps may spontaneously happen.

Tonight, our last night here, one of our sister goddesses who lives on Kauai will join us for dinner and we’ll have some “us time” as well. I know that we will be rejuvenated and re-created by all of this time. And we will go home rested and filled with joy.

Don’t wait. Start now. Schedule that me time. And let us know how you feel afterwards.

Helpful hint:  it can help to schedule “me time” with a girlfriend. Because we may let ourselves down, but we will not let our girlfriends down. Who knows? It may become a habit. Let’s hope so, anyway.

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Four Ways to Sleep Better with Night Sweats

me in bed2

Enjoy this guest post by Renae Farley – and be sure and read to the end for the discount code for Keep the Peace Bedding.

Four Ways to Sleep Better with Night Sweats
By Renae Farley, founder of Keep the Peace Bedding

For women going through menopause, or for people battling cancer or who simply have a different internal thermostat from their partner, night sweats can often be an uncomfortable barrier to getting a good night’s rest – something most of you know all too well!

This problem rang true for me after I got married. My husband would sleep with the door open and just a sheet, but I would need a down comforter to keep me warm. That comforter usually ended up doubled on my side of the bed, and then I would roast and not be able to sleep. Years later, when I was diagnosed with breast cancer, the night sweats got worse when my doctors put me on estrogen suppressants. Enter the incessant cycle of throwing off the comforter, only to wake up freezing cold a little while later.

I have interviewed dozens of people over the last seven years, and nearly 85 percent have had the same sleeping issues. One partner sleeps warm and one sleeps cold, and the issues only get worse as women age. One report of more than 2,000 primary care patients found that 40 percent of adults get night sweats at least once a month, a rate that increases in both women and men between 41 and 55.

If you (or your partner) are battling this nocturnal enemy, here are my top tips for coping with night sweats – you’ll note some top docs support my philosophy as well!

Avoid caffeine and alcohol at night: Indulging in a “night cap” can actually make it more difficult to sleep. Drinking alcohol or caffeine before bed has been shown to worsen nocturnal hot flashes and night sweats. Swap your nightly glass of red wine for ice water. Also, skip the Sriracha or other hot sauce with dinner. Spicy foods heat up your internal temperature, contributing to night sweats.

Find custom bedding: Invest in linens that provide options for you and your partner. For example, Keep the Peace Bedding offers several different bedding materials, such as lightweight goose down or bamboo matelassé, that can easily be zipped together so each person is comfortable, or unzipped to make a personal blanket that won’t disturb your partner if you have to flip it on and off. It is used under your regular decorative coverlet. Also consider sheets and sleepwear that are made from special fabrics – I’ll again recommend bamboo –  that wick moisture away from your body.

Make friends with fans: I cannot rest without my celling fan! Cranking the air conditioning might make the room too cold, but a ceiling fan provides just the right amount of cooling and air circulation. I also discovered a great product called the “Portable Cooler,” which is a mini AC fan. I have used it for months, and it really works! You simply wet a sponge, place it inside the unit and say, “ahhhh.” I keep it on my nightstand, and when I wake up to a night sweat, I use it on my face for instant relief.

Tap into your breath: The National Institutes of Health (NIH) says “slow, rhythmic deep breathing” can help calm hot flashes and night sweats.

There is no silver bullet that will completely eradicate nocturnal night sweats, but with these strategies, I have managed to get better shut-eye and keep the peace in the process.

In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, I am offering a special “shop for a cause” promotion on all Keep the Peace Bedding products for the month of October. When you give the gift of tranquil, restorative sleep to yourself or a loved one, you’ll save 10% on your order. That 10% will then be donated to help patients currently battling breast cancer. Simply customize your order and use code “bcawareness” at checkout.

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Maintaining a Healthy Sex Life During and After Menopause

Butterflies Together © lynette sheppard

Butterflies Together © lynette sheppard

Please enjoy this guest post submitted by Angela Peck.

When most people hear the phrase “The Change,” a slew of unsavory side effects come to mind, with hot flashes, night sweats, and insomnia among them. But perhaps the most frustrating problem facing women during menopause is the loss of sex drive. Though completely normal, a lack of desire for intimacy often leads to feelings of guilt and sadness, and it can create a rift in your relationship with your partner. According to Oprah.com, nearly 50 percent of menopausal women confess to experiencing these emotional aspects of menopause in addition to the physical ones. But contrary to popular opinion that menopause causes your vagina to shrivel up overnight (and your sex life along with it), there are steps you can take to maintain a healthy libido during your second act.

Live a Healthy Lifestyle

Though many may not realize it, your overall health has a direct impact on your love life. A poor diet or unhealthy habits can lead to a dismal sex drive, causing an already low libido to further dip. Woman’s Day reveals that one of the best ways to amp up your sex drive is to work on your health first. This means eating a nutritious diet, exercising regularly, maintaining a healthy weight, getting enough sleep, and not smoking.

Along with leading a healthy lifestyle, any existing medical conditions, such as diabetes or high blood pressure, should be properly treated. Managing these issues not only improves your overall health, but it can often enhance your sex drive.

Invest in a Good Lubricant

Vaginal dryness is a reality of sex after menopause, and one that most women experience. Less estrogen means less blood flow to your erogenous zones, which often leads to dryness and, as a result, painful sex. In order to make sex more comfortable, lubricant is a must. If you’ve never used lube before, it can seem intimidating at first. But as Adam and Eve points out, making use of a quality lubricant, particularly those of the silicone-based variety, is often the best way to mimic your own natural lubrication.

If pain during sex persists, even with the aid of a lubricant, you may want to ask your doctor about prescription medications designed to combat dryness. Vaginal creams are a popular option and typically have fewer side effects than oral hormones.

Communicate with Your Partner

Maintaining a healthy sex life during menopause relies on two things: open communication with your significant other and persistence. Talking with your partner about the emotional and physical obstacles you’re experiencing can help assuage worries you both may have about the future of your sexual relationship.

Because menopause affects every woman differently, there will likely be ups and downs when it comes to desire. During times of decreased libido, WebMD suggests taking the focus off of intercourse. Try spending more time on foreplay and explore other varieties of intimacy with your partner, such as massage or oral sex. The most important thing you can do to rev up libido is make sure that your sex life doesn’t come to a screeching halt. The act of intercourse alone stimulates blood flow to the vagina, keeping it healthy—and you and your partner happy.

Though menopause does signal the end of an era, it doesn’t have to mean the end of your sex life. With a few simple steps, you can enjoy this second stage of your life—both in and out of the bedroom—fully.

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Healthy Heart Talk for Women

Heart disease is the number 1 killer of women. And a woman’s symptoms of heart attack often vary greatly from the classic symptoms that men suffer such as crushing chest pain radiating down the left arm. Women are much more likely to suffer jaw or neck pain, pain between the shoulder blades, or shortness of breath with sweating (heck that’s me every day on my run). There may be stomach or chest pain, but heart attack may also present as fatigue. Speaking as a former coronary care nurse, I can also add “feeling of impending doom” associated with any of the symptoms as a red flag. Don’t be stoic, get to an ER right away and get checked out. Oh, and if you have that feeling of impending doom? Call 911. I personally know a number of women who did and didn’t that suffered heart attacks. Getting medical help pronto saved heart muscle.

But better than getting treatment is prevention. Our pals at University of Florida shared this helpful infographic about the ins and outs of heart disease. Of course, prevention can be boiled down to a few simple interventions. A nurse friend of mine who also happens to be a hospital administrator has her own three point plan: eat well, destress, and keep moving. I couldn’t have said it better.

heart-disease-101-the-basics

For more info, click here.

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Healthy Aging For Women

This informative infographic was provided to us by our friends at the University of Florida. Once the hormonal whirlwind begins to settle for us, our attention rightly turns to how to stay healthy and vibrant throughout the aging process. While I personally don’t agree with every recommendation (giving up alcohol altogether, for example, and the jury is still out on whether estrogen replacement actually prevents heart disease since contradictory studies exist), I believe that there are some wonderful commonsense recommendations in the areas of diet, exercise, and mental health.

healthy-aging-for-women

Find out more:

Healthy Aging

Bachelor of Science in Health Education and Behavior

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